Sable reproduction – Asso Sable http://asso-sable.net/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 16:55:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://asso-sable.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/asso-120x120.png Sable reproduction – Asso Sable http://asso-sable.net/ 32 32 Of interest: July 30, 2022 | New https://asso-sable.net/of-interest-july-30-2022-new/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/of-interest-july-30-2022-new/ The Mountain Club participates in the celebration of the museum ELIZABETHTOWN — The public is invited to join the Algonquin Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club on August 6 to attend the centennial celebration of the Museum of Adirondack History in Elizabethtown from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The celebration includes refreshments, talks by many […]]]>

The Mountain Club participates in the celebration of the museum

ELIZABETHTOWN — The public is invited to join the Algonquin Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club on August 6 to attend the centennial celebration of the Museum of Adirondack History in Elizabethtown from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The celebration includes refreshments, talks by many Adirondack luminaries, a social hour and more.

Reservations are required to attend. Chef: Lynn Valenti, 518-562-0553. Contact Lynn for details before 8/6.

The Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder association announces the winners of the competition

BURKE – The Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder association has announced the winners of the youth competition. Board members Carole Bracy and Mary Craig announced the winners and Dean Butler, actor from the TV show “Little House on the Praire” who played Almonzo Wilder, presented the awards.

The first-place essay contest winner was Emmett Turner of Rouses Point and Aliza Kingsley of Brushton-Moira Elementary. In second place are Mason Anthony Estling of Patrova Elementary-Saranac Lake and Ria Cotto of Rouses Point. Kael Ryan-Gadway, of Rouses Point Elementary, was named Honorary Almanzo and Ophelia Dtil, of Rouses Point, Honorary Laura.

Winners of the mixed media art competition include Ophelia Dutil, of Rouses Point, in first place for her piece “Throwing the Black Brush.”; Sam Harkness of Flanders in second and Ariana Burdash of Flanders in third place.

Winners of the marker art competition include Ryan Leclerc of Flanders first for his ‘Wilder farm’ piece. Grayson Penera of Flanders in second place for ‘Farmer Boy’s Farm’ and Colin Andrews of St. Joseph’s-Malone work untitled.

Winners of the pencil art competition include Emmett Turner, of Rouses Point, for ‘A Boy on The Farm’; Colin Lawrence, of Rouses Point, second for “Lucy”; Third place was Isaac Ashline of Rouses Point for ‘Wilder Homestead’ with an honorable mention for Aubree Wright of Rouses Point for ‘One Room School House’.

Winners of the colored pencil art contest include Charlee Hutchins, of St. Joseph, first; Brookelynn Richards of Flanders in second and Sydney Scott of Flanders in third.

The Abortion Access Committee will screen “Happening”

SARANAC LAKE — The Adirondack Abortion Access Committee Voters for Change will present a screening of the film “Happening” showing what life was like before abortion was legal.

The screening will take place on Tuesday, August 2 at 7 p.m. at the Lake Flower Landing located at 421 Lake Flower Avenue, Saranac Lake.

“Happening” is based on a true story from the early 1960s, when abortion and contraceptives were illegal in France. Anyone who had an abortion or assisted in an abortion was liable to imprisonment.

Directed by Audrey Diwan who co-wrote the screenplay with Annie Ernaux and Marcia Romano, the film follows Anne’s story. A young college student with a future ahead of her who finds out she’s pregnant, leaving her with two life-altering choices.

A panel discussion will take place after the screening with Planned Parenthood of the North Country CEO Tess Barker, Eve Burns, James Pete and with Dorothy Federman as moderator.

The panel will include a discussion about the film and will address the question: What is the future of reproductive freedom in New York and our country?

The film is intended for an informed public only, masks are mandatory to attend this event. Donations are appreciated and reservations are recommended as space is limited.

To make a reservation, email vfc2014ny@gmail.com

Fort Ticonderoga to host “Sound of 1776” event

TICONDEROGA – The Fort Ticonderoga Association invites everyone to discover the sights and sounds of the American army during the Sound of 1776 Living History.

The event will take place on Saturday August 6th and Sunday August 7th at Fort Ticonderoga located at 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga.

Attendees will experience the sounds of trades, weapon demonstrations, living history vignettes and even musical performances. The sounds that thousands of soldiers have heard living and fighting for the fort.

“Visitors will enter the iconic fort during this special event and witness our nation’s fight for freedom in 1776,” said Beth L. Hill, President and CEO of Fort Ticonderoga.

“March with our fifes and drums and discover the importance of music in coordinating the daily orders of American troops. Enjoy patriotic concerts and savor the beauty of one of the most historic and beautiful places in the world.

In addition to these activities, participants will have the opportunity to participate in guided tours, observe various other demonstrations and listen to a reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Registration opens for the ADK Lake Alliance Symposium

PAUL SMITHS — Registration for the Seventh Annual Adirondack Lake Alliance Symposium is now open for a $25 fee.

The event will take place on Friday, August 5 at Paul Smith College located at 7777 NY-30, Paul Smiths, NY.

The theme for this year’s event “will be inspired by coming together for the good of our lakes,” according to a press release.

“This event is for Adirondack Park Lake Associations, but is really for anyone who has a connection to Adirondack waters and wants to learn more about watershed issues and solutions, said Scott Ireland, ALA Executive Director.

“Whether you are a waterfront property owner, recreational enthusiast, or simply appreciate the importance of clean water, you will learn something new at the symposium and connect with others who care deeply about our waterways. .

Dan Kelting, Executive Director of Paul Smith’s College Watershed Institute, will provide an update on the efforts of the Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force.

Chris Mikolajczyk, president of the North American Lake Management Society and aquatic ecologist at PrincetonHydro, will present the benefits of developing a lake management plan.

In addition to these guest speakers, three presentations will take place throughout the day. One focusing on invasive species management and the new NYS Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Certification Program, a second presentation on On-Site Sanitation Systems and the final presentation will discuss education and community training for members of lake associations.

“We hope people leave the symposium with stronger, more meaningful connections to other lake association members in the area and additional tools to help protect our Adirondack water bodies,” Ireland added. .

Jay Day 2022 Celebration Planned

JAY – The Rotary Club of AuSable Valley will host this year’s Jay Day celebration on Saturday, August 13 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Jay Village Green located at 12964 State Highway 9 North, Jay, NY.

The event will include food, craft vendors, live music, games and activities. The Dogfather, Tammy’s Lunch Box, Ding-A-Ling, Boba Trailer and Hex and Hop Brewery will be on hand to offer concessions.

Too Tall String Band will give a free concert at 6 p.m.

For more information, visit the AuSable Valley Rotary Facebook page.

The Clinton County Legislature will convene

PLATTSBURGH — The Clinton County Legislature will meet Wednesday, Aug. 3 at 5 p.m. in the Clinton County Legislature Chambers located at 137 Margaret Street, Plattsburgh.

The meeting agenda includes a discussion of lead agency status under the state Environmental Quality Review Act for a project in the town of Schuyler Falls.

Jay and Black Brook will hold a joint meeting

BLACK BROOK – The City Councils of the Town of Jay and the Town of Black Brook will hold a joint meeting on Friday, August 12 at 6 p.m. at the Town of Black Brook offices located at 18 N Main St, Au Sable Forks, NY .

Topics of the meeting include a review of all maps, plans and reports regarding the Public Order Order dated February 2022 approving the construction of disinfection and phosphorus treatment systems and upgrades.

Expansion of the Essex Co. Cornell cooperative to meet

LEWIS – Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Essex County will hold a public hearing on Monday, August 15 at 5 p.m. at the Lewis Town Hall located at 8574 US Route 9, Lewis.

Comments will be accepted from 5:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. regarding CCE Essex’s proposal to allow board members to attend meetings remotely in extraordinary circumstances. Comments can be submitted in person or digitally by August 12 at 4:30 p.m.

A regular CCE Essex Board meeting will follow. It is free and open to the public. For more information, call 518-962-4810.

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New board games – Expansion “Marvel Villainous: We Are Venom” https://asso-sable.net/new-board-games-expansion-marvel-villainous-we-are-venom/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 19:18:15 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/new-board-games-expansion-marvel-villainous-we-are-venom/ The game box, mover and a villain card for this Marvel Villainous expansion | Source: Ravensburger North America/The Pop Insider The world of villains continues to grow! Following the recent debut of Star Wars Villainous, Ravensburger is expanding its popular series of villain-focused tabletop games with a new addition to the Marvel Villainous game. In […]]]>
The game box, mover and a villain card for this Marvel Villainous expansion | Source: Ravensburger North America/The Pop Insider

The world of villains continues to grow! Following the recent debut of Star Wars Villainous, Ravensburger is expanding its popular series of villain-focused tabletop games with a new addition to the Marvel Villainous game.

In Marvel Villainous: We Are Venom, players take on the role of the iconic alien symbiote from the Spider-Man franchise. According to Cassidy Warner, Head of Games at Ravensburger North America, Venom was one of the most requested villains for the game.

This new version is a single character expansion, which means it can be combined with any existing Marvel Villainous game (Marvel Villainous: Infinite Power or Marvel Villainous: Mischief & Malice) but cannot be played alone .

Venom’s engine is a detailed gray sculpt of the symbiote’s head, complete with sharp teeth and long, thin tongue. To achieve the character’s goal (which is the main objective of any Villainous game), players must bind Spider-Man to the symbiote by overwhelming him with a number of symbiote tokens greater than his strength.

Venom’s allies will include Agony, Lasher, Scream, Phage, and Riot, while heroes such as Black Cat, Scarlet Spider, and Silver Sable will stand in his way.

This extension will be available exclusively on Amazon in October, followed by a wide release in November.

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Wednesday, July 27, 2022 | Kaiser Health News https://asso-sable.net/wednesday-july-27-2022-kaiser-health-news/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:58:06 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/wednesday-july-27-2022-kaiser-health-news/ To resolve veterans’ hearing loss lawsuit, 3M sets aside $1 billion NBC News reports how a lawsuit centered on protecting earplugs for US service makers has impacted manufacturer 3M. Also in the news are strong healthcare CEO earnings, new heart drug sales, GSK earnings, Biogen’s ALS therapy, health insurance pricing data and more. Of the […]]]>

To resolve veterans’ hearing loss lawsuit, 3M sets aside $1 billion

NBC News reports how a lawsuit centered on protecting earplugs for US service makers has impacted manufacturer 3M. Also in the news are strong healthcare CEO earnings, new heart drug sales, GSK earnings, Biogen’s ALS therapy, health insurance pricing data and more. Of the industry.

NBC News: 3M creates billion-dollar trust for service members who say its earplugs haven’t protected them from hearing loss

Faced with thousands of lawsuits from US service members who said 3M earplugs failed to protect their hearing, the manufacturing giant announced it was committing $1 billion to a trust to resolve the lawsuits — and that Aearo Technologies, the 3M unit that made the caps, is filing voluntary bankruptcy under the plan. (Morgenson, 7/26)

In other industry news —

Stat: Healthcare High Rollers: As the pandemic raged, CEO earnings surged

The CEOs of about 300 healthcare companies collectively took home more than $4.5 billion in 2021, according to a STAT analysis of hundreds of financial documents. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals CEO Leonard Schleifer alone accounted for 10% of that total, raking in an incredible $453 million. (Herman, Sheridan, Parker, Feuerstein, and Ravindranath, 7/18)

The Washington Post: Opioid maker Teva agrees to $4.25 billion tentative deal

If the deal is finalized, the company will pay $3 billion in cash and $1.2 billion in donations of Narcan, the drug that reverses overdoses, over 13 years. About $100 million would be distributed to the tribes. The sum includes $650 million that the company has already agreed to pay when settling cases with Texas, Florida, West Virginia and others. (Kornfield, 7/27)

The Wall Street Journal: Drugmakers hope new heart drugs will boost sales and revive the market

The once lucrative market for heart drugs is now on the verge of a comeback, albeit at the cost of heavy investment in research and deal-making. After seeing low-cost generics take over sales of blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart medications, companies have struggled to discover substitutes and then get reimbursement for five-figure prices. Drugmakers are now launching new drugs, even if their market prospects are uncertain. (Hopkins, 7/26)

Reuters: GSK raises full-year guidance, days after consumer health spin-off

GSK (GSK.L) raised its full-year forecast on Wednesday, boosted by reinvigorated demand for its blockbuster vaccine Shingrix, days after the company overhauled with the spin-off of its large healthcare unit. audience. GSK now expects 2022 sales to grow 6% to 8% and adjusted operating profit to grow 13% to 15%, excluding any contribution from the COVID-19 solutions business. 19 of the company. (7/27)

Stat: American Cancer Society’s VC Arm partners with Third Rock

Cancer startups aren’t exactly underfunded — as a disease area, oncology has captured the attention of investors over the past decade. But the American Cancer Society sees shortcomings. “Oncology is actually very well funded and invested. The challenge is, is the money going to the areas where there is the greatest impact?” said Alice Pomponio, managing director of the firm’s venture capital arm, BrightEdge. (DeAngelis, 7/26)

Stat: Cue Health Rode Covid at a $3 billion valuation. Now he faces a difficult future

It didn’t have the brand recognition of Abbott, or the billions of multinational medical technology company Becton Dickinson. Before the pandemic hit, Cue Health didn’t even have a product on the market. What the young company had in July 2020 was an agreement to provide its newly authorized Covid-19 test for the National Basketball Association’s high-profile bubble. (Palmer, 07/27)

Reuters: BioNTech and Pfizer sue CureVac in US over COVID-19 vaccine patent claims

July 26 (Reuters) – COVID-19 vaccine maker BioNTech (22UAy.DE) said on Tuesday that it and its partner Pfizer (PFE.N) had filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, seeking a judgment that they had not infringed US patents held by rival CureVac (5CV.DE). The lawsuit, filed Monday, said CureVac was trying to cash in on the success of COVID-19 vaccines from BioNTech and Pfizer after CureVac’s efforts to create its own vaccine failed. (Hamburger, 07/26)

Also –

Reuters: US FDA accepts Biogen’s ALS therapy for review

Biogen Inc’s (BIIB.O) treatment for a rare type of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been accepted for review by the US health regulator, weeks after follow-up analyzes of data from a Failed late-stage study suggested the drug was likely to work. (07/26)

On health care costs —

KHN: Health insurance price data: It exists, but it’s not for the faint-hearted

Data buffs with powerful computers are delighted. Ordinary consumers, not so much. That’s the reaction about three weeks after a data dump of enormous proportions. Health insurers post their negotiated rates for just about every type of medical service they cover with every provider. (Appleby, 7/27)

KHN: Bill Of The Month: Ambulance Chased Patient Into Collections

In retrospect, Peggy Dula said she shouldn’t have taken the ambulance. She was the least injured of the three siblings who were in a car when she was hit by a van last September. Her daughter had even offered to come to the scene of the accident and pick her up. Jim Martens, 62, and Cynthia Martens, 63, Peggy’s brother and sister, were more seriously injured and were heading to hospital in separate ambulances. Peggy, 55, was told it would be a good idea for her to get checked too. So she accepted a ride with a third ambulance team. (Sable-Smith, 7/27)

KHN: Listen: Can California lower the price of insulin?

California Healthline senior correspondent Angela Hart describes California’s ambitious plan to manufacture generic insulin under the state’s new “CalRx” drug label. (7/27)

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Malawi moves elephants from overcrowded park to bigger one https://asso-sable.net/malawi-moves-elephants-from-overcrowded-park-to-bigger-one/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 15:58:03 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/malawi-moves-elephants-from-overcrowded-park-to-bigger-one/ LIWONDE NATIONAL PARK, Malawi (AP) – A tranquilized baby elephant is hoisted into the air and gently placed in a large truck that will take it to a new home. One by one, 250 elephants are being moved from Malawi’s overcrowded Liwonde National Park to the much larger Kasungu Park, 380 kilometers (236 miles) in […]]]>

LIWONDE NATIONAL PARK, Malawi (AP) – A tranquilized baby elephant is hoisted into the air and gently placed in a large truck that will take it to a new home.

One by one, 250 elephants are being moved from Malawi’s overcrowded Liwonde National Park to the much larger Kasungu Park, 380 kilometers (236 miles) in the north of the country.

The elephants are tracked around the park and darts are fired to calm them down. While they sleep, they are moved in the big trucks that take them to Kusungu Park.

So far, at least 40 elephants have been relocated and the rest are expected to leave by the end of the month at a total cost of around $1.5-2 million, officials say. In addition, around 405 other wildlife including buffaloes, impalas, sables, warthogs and waterbucks will be relocated to Kasungu.

The whole process is a cooperation between the Department of National Parks and Wildlife of Malawi, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and African Parks.


“This will establish viable elephant populations and ensure the prosperity of local communities living around the parks. It will also reduce pressure on the habitat and reduce human-wildlife conflict, said African Parks Malawi representative Sam Kamoto.

African Parks is a non-profit organization that manages and rehabilitates national parks in partnership with governments and local communities. The group currently manages 20 national parks and protected areas in 11 African countries, including Malawi.

Since 2015, Liwonde National Park has been managed by African Parks which discovered that its more than 600 elephants were threatening the park’s vegetation and biodiversity.

Liwonde’s 548 square kilometers (211 sq mi) of floodplains, lagoons and forests are home to over 400 species of birds and numerous mammals. But its elephants, reproducing at the rate of 10% a year, could soon overwhelm the park, experts say.

In contrast, Kasungu National Park is about four times larger at 2,100 square kilometers (810 square miles) but has far fewer wildlife. Kasungu once had around 1,200 elephants, but years of poaching reduced their numbers to around 49 in 2015, park officials said.

Since then, Malawi’s national parks and international groups, including the United States Agency for International Development, have worked together to improve elephant protection, and the elephant population in Kasungu Park has grown to around 120. Introduction of 250 Liwonde elephants will promote population viability in Kasungu, he said.

“The translocation of elephants and other wildlife is a significant achievement and proves that the national parks’ approach to working with partners to secure their natural resources is sound,” said Patricio Ndadzela, a representative in Malawi of the International Fund. for the protection of animals. .

A 40 kilometer (25 mile) elephant proof fence has been constructed along the eastern boundary of Kasungu Park to prevent elephants from straying into farmland and will prevent conflicts between communities and elephants , Ndadzela said.

Restoring Kasungu’s elephant population will enhance its appeal as a tourist destination and in turn improve the local economy, he said.

This is not the first time that large numbers of elephants have been moved from one park to another in Malawi. In 2016, African Parks moved 520 elephants to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve.

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Review of Normal Family by Chrysta Bilton https://asso-sable.net/review-of-normal-family-by-chrysta-bilton/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/review-of-normal-family-by-chrysta-bilton/ Comment this story Comment When Chrysta Bilton’s mother found “The One”, she knew it. He was a stranger on the street and not someone she would marry, but he was the man she would persuade to share her cum so she could ‘go home, pull out a turkey baster and s ‘to impregnate, to permeate”. […]]]>

Comment

When Chrysta Bilton’s mother found “The One”, she knew it. He was a stranger on the street and not someone she would marry, but he was the man she would persuade to share her cum so she could ‘go home, pull out a turkey baster and s ‘to impregnate, to permeate”.

That our existence begins with a clash of cells doesn’t mean there’s nothing divine about it, Bilton believes. As one of 36 children conceived with sperm from the same donor, Bilton considers genetic inheritance and fate from an unusual perspective in his memoir, “Normal Family: On Truth, Love, and How I Met My 35 Siblings”.

21 books to read this summer

A 2007 New York Times article introduced Bilton’s father to the world. Then 50-year-old Jeffrey Harrison (aka Donor 150) lived with four dogs in an RV in Venice, Calif., and he had been one of the most requested donors associated with California Cryobank.

The dozens of parents who chose vials of his sperm were drawn to his interest in yoga, his acting experience, his height and his blue eyes. (His acting consisted mostly of strip-o-gram gigs, and his good looks led to a nude appearance as Mr. November 1984 in Playgirl.) For Bilton’s mother, Debra, a cult-prone lesbian, Harrison was more than a sperm donor. He was a living specimen of what she wanted in a child.

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“It couldn’t be just any sperm,” Bilton wrote of Debra’s search as a future single mother of choice in the early 1980s. “She needed someone beautiful. Talented. Someone who looked at the role with flair and a pedigree. Harrison was related to a former Supreme Court Justice, we learn, and Debra is the granddaughter of former California Governor Culbert Olson.

She first considers the Repository for Germinal Choice, filled with the sperm of Nobel laureates who have agreed to anonymously share their gifted DNA with the world. She receives three vials of genetic material from a Stanford mathematician. The first overflows onto the dining room table; the second does not lead to pregnancy. Before her final attempt, Debra hires a private investigator and abandons the third vial after learning that the donor is “the baldest, most unattractive teacher Debra has ever seen”.

Debra is having her hair done when Harrison enters from the left of the stage: “He looked like a god who had just come down from the sky.” She persuades him over coffee to sell her his sperm for $2,000. Payments are made in multiple installments of $200 – one after each of 10 sperm deposits, giving Debra a chance to get to know Harrison better on her repeated trips to the cryobank. There is an additional request: to swear that he will not donate to anyone else.

A writer has spent her career digging into her past. Then she did an ancestry DNA test.

To Bilton’s credit, the mythology around Harrison’s X Factor exists primarily in his mother’s account. Of her own sublime design, Bilton writes, Debra “inseminated herself, then they both closed their eyes and sang three Hindu oms.”

When Bilton’s younger sister, Kaitlyn, is similarly conceived a few years later, Harrison begins to cry over the millions of chicken souls crushed every day by factory farming. Over time, Debra realizes that “even if she had been able to convince Jeffrey to play dad, maybe he wasn’t a desirable candidate in the first place”.

Harrison is prone to believing in conspiracy theories, and at one point he thinks he’s the messiah. But he’s not the biggest character in “Normal Family.” Debra, born into privilege but with estranged parents and a hidden family tragedy, bounces from a cult to an ashram to a multi-level marketing scheme and through a series of love houses. She figures like a kind of Forrest Gump, bridging social eras in a changing United States. She spends time meditating with the Beatles, teaches Buddhism to Tina Turner, dates Jeff Bridges and Warren Beatty, hangs out with Angela Davis, and works as “Ross Perot’s lesbian.”

Debra is very likeable as a person trying to do the impossible – to create a stable home for her children as a gay mother in Ronald Reagan’s America. Parental figures come and go as Debra’s love life evolves. Annie, one of Debra’s first partners, disappears too soon for Bilton to remember her, then comes “Mommy Fay”, a divorced friend with her own children, then Sable, Lily Tomlin’s assistant. Bilton scours homes and caring relatives as Debra searches for a sense of love and financial security, in what is often the only gay family on the block.

As Bilton begins to wonder why “Dad” doesn’t live with them, Debra arranges for Harrison to drop by. “A dozen times a year, mom would clean dad, give him a shower, maybe send him to the dentist, and then pop him onto the stage of our lives,” Bilton writes. He is legally required to sign the birth certificate, although his role as a father figure is more of a guest spot. The struggle for Bilton isn’t that she was conceived with donated sperm, but rather that Harrison – sometimes homeless and often drug addicted – is her biological father.

Bilton doesn’t spend much time thinking about the rights of donor children or parents in assisted reproduction (which can discriminate against same-sex parents). And she has little to say about class and racial barriers to accessing reproductive technologies.

The many feminists who cross Debra’s life – such as Jane Fonda, Angela Davis – are verified without their criticisms creeping into the text. Davis, for example, wrote at length about how the patriarchal white family ideal allowed society to blame black families for their poverty. There are utopian moments in which the Amazonian presence of Debra’s friends envelopes Bilton and his sister Kaitlyn in warmth and support, but there’s also the awkwardness of Debra’s belief in “pedigree” and good sperm count. as she struggles to somehow fit the mold. from a “normal” family.

Through the donor sibling registry, Bilton’s half-siblings reunite and go public with their story, which Harrison sees. He begins to meet some of his descendants and tells them about Bilton and Kaitlyn. The sisters receive messages from the Facebook group Donor 150 and later from Ancestry.com. Bilton questions the role of genetics in his biological siblings’ dimples and how many have cats and let their phone batteries drain to bits. But this part of the book is less interesting than the powerful story of Debra who wants her children to be with money and persuasion, doing her best to create a sense of family despite her struggles and addictions. If she “acts out” the idea of ​​a father figure, all parents create a narrative that their children may or may not accept.

Late in the book, Debra finds out about all the children Harrison helped create through his paid donations to the cryobank, and she decides to cut him off. She launches into a panic when she learns that Bilton has planned to arrange a reunion with his half-siblings. And Bilton realizes that Donor 150’s many children are ultimately a testament to his mother’s agency: “Without her, none of these people would be alive, at least in the iteration in which they currently existed.”

Janet Manley is an Australian critic and writer.

On Truth, Love, and How I Met My 35 Siblings

Little, Brown and Co. 288 pages. $29

A note to our readers

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to allow us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliate sites.

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Scientists descend on Sable Island for massive fog study https://asso-sable.net/scientists-descend-on-sable-island-for-massive-fog-study/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/scientists-descend-on-sable-island-for-massive-fog-study/ On Sable Island, Nova Scotia, scientists can be found among horses, seals and seabirds this summer. The island is home to an international study aimed at improving the prediction of sea fog, one of the greatest challenges in meteorology. “We’ve been planning this for almost two years and now hundreds of instruments are being deployed. […]]]>

On Sable Island, Nova Scotia, scientists can be found among horses, seals and seabirds this summer.

The island is home to an international study aimed at improving the prediction of sea fog, one of the greatest challenges in meteorology.

“We’ve been planning this for almost two years and now hundreds of instruments are being deployed. Some of them are already sending us data,” project manager Joe Fernando of Notre Dame University said in a statement. Edge of the Dunes interview with CBC News.

Location, location, location

It is no coincidence that Sable Island was chosen as the site for this field investigation. A climate study determined it to be the foggiest place on earth during the summer, Fernando said.

“It’s quite an expensive place to work because of the logistical requirements. But it’s the most scientifically promising place to study sea fog,” Fernando told CBC News.

A climate study determined Sable Island to be the foggiest place on earth during the summer. (Robert Short/CBC)

The crescent of sand 300 kilometers off Halifax lies at the intersection of major Atlantic forces: where the warm Gulf Stream meets the cold Labrador Stream and near the break in the continental shelf where turbulence ocean raises tiny salt particles that create fog when water droplets form on them.

The interaction of all the atmospheric and oceanic processes involved is not fully understood – one of the reasons why fog can only be predicted hours in advance, if at all.

“Because fog is such a difficult problem involving all of these processes coming together, you have to probe each of the causal factors and then piece the story together,” Fernando said.

The Sable Island Deployment

To try to better understand its properties, they erected towers with instruments to measure thermal and solar radiation, installed optical sensors and equipment that, for the first time, can measure drizzle droplets, courtesy of Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Drones and weather balloons will also be deployed.

The United States Office of Naval Research is funding the two-year, US$7.5 million project, which has its own acronym: FATIMA, for Fog and Turbulence Interactions in the Marine Atmosphere.

The data is not classified.

Dozens of scientists involved

The FATIMA project brought together dozens of scientists from multiple institutions and disciplines.

One is Qing Wang, a professor in the Department of Meteorology at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.

On Sable, she tries to measure the fog as it passes between optical sensors. She wants to know why it’s so hard to see through the fog. “We need to start from the basics to understand what really affects optical propagation and how it relates to general weather patterns, fog characteristics,” she said in an interview on the western end of the island.

Applications of his research include civil aviation, high-energy laser weapons used by the military, and free-space optical communication – the wireless transmission of data through the air using light.

After 25 years of reporting on Sable Island, Paul Withers can finally leave

Paul Withers can finally cross off visiting Sable Island from his to-do list. But it wasn’t exactly the easiest shoot he’s ever been on.

The instruments were surrounded by temporary fencing, under the direction of Parks Canada, which manages the island.

“When the team developed the research study, they consulted with Parks Canada staff to ensure it was both logistically and ecologically feasible,” said Jennifer Nicholson, of Parks Canada. .

“We have 569 horses on this island, so the fencing is primarily there not only to protect the instruments and valuable equipment that the team brought to the island, but also for the safety and protection of the horses.”

The ship’s expedition leaves Halifax on Friday

In addition to the Sable field study, the FATIMA study chartered the Irving-owned supply vessel Atlantic Condor at a cost of $1.9 million.

This week, the ship was transformed into a floating laboratory. He leaves Halifax for a month-long mission from Sable Island to the Grand Banks off Newfoundland on Friday.

Ed Creegan is the chief scientist aboard the Atlantic Condor which has been transformed into a floating laboratory. (Paul Withers/CBC)

Between 25 and 30 instruments were mounted above deck to obtain clean samples free of ship emissions and distortions caused by the shape of the ship, which alters the airflow.

They include aerosol monitors from Dalhousie University in Halifax.

The ship will also deploy ocean gliders, balloons and monitors to measure conditions above and below the surface.

“It’s quite ambitious,” said Ed Creegan, chief scientist on board.

“This is a large-scale campaign from the ship’s perspective in particular, because we’re so heavily instrumenting the atmospheric measurements, we’re so heavily instrumenting the aerosol measurements, which really hasn’t been done. on a ship-to-everything based platform,” he said.

Next year, the FATIMA project will move to the Yellow Sea off Korea.

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What if Roe v. Wade is cancelled? https://asso-sable.net/what-if-roe-v-wade-is-cancelled/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/what-if-roe-v-wade-is-cancelled/ Follow our live updates on the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Friday’s Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade will usher in a United States not seen in half a century, in which the legal status of abortion depends entirely on the states. Now that the law has changed, reproductive rights will […]]]>

Follow our live updates on the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Friday’s Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade will usher in a United States not seen in half a century, in which the legal status of abortion depends entirely on the states. Now that the law has changed, reproductive rights will be rewritten almost immediately.

No. Each state will decide if and when abortions will be legal. Many states will continue to allow them, and some have even begun making provisions to help women who live in states that may restrict abortion.

Abortion will likely become illegal in about half of the states, although predictions differ.

According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, a group that fights abortion restrictions in court and closely monitors state laws, 25 states are likely to ban abortion. These states are: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The Guttmacher Institute, a research group focused on reproductive health care, says a slightly different set of states are likely to significantly limit access to abortion: its list of 26 states excludes North Carolina and Pennsylvania, but includes Florida, Iowa and Montana.

Thirteen states have so-called trigger laws, which make abortion illegal after Roe’s fall. Some have old abortion laws on the books that were struck down by the Roe decision but could be enforced again. Still other states, like Oklahoma, have abortion bans that passed this legislative session, despite the Roe precedent.

Some women seeking abortions might obtain them through other means, including traveling to a state where abortion is legal or ordering pills online from outside the country. Texas provides an example. In September, a law came into effect prohibiting abortion after detection of fetal heart activity, approximately six weeks. Abortions in Texas clinics have halved. But many women were able to get abortions in nearby states or by ordering pills, resulting in an overall drop of only about 10%.

Without Roe, abortion will likely decline further because women will have to travel farther to reach a state where it is legal. Many women who have abortions are poor and the long journeys can be overwhelming. States likely to ban abortion are concentrated in the South, Midwest and Great Plains. Due to the expected increase in interstate travel, the remaining clinics will most likely have less capacity to treat women who can reach them.

Research from December on estimated changes in distances to clinics found that, if Roe were canceled, the number of legal abortions would likely drop by about 14% (updated to 13% in more recent research). Our December article explained this research and offered a map of where abortions were likely to decline the most.

Under Roe, about one in four American women were expected to have an abortion at some point, according to a Guttmacher Institute study.

This includes women from all walks of life. But statistics show that women who have abortions in the United States are more likely to be single; be in your twenties; have low income; and already have a child. They are disproportionately likely to be black. They are more likely to live in a Democratic-leaning state.

Our December article describes the demographic characteristics of the typical abortive patient.

The United States now joins a very small group of countries that have tightened abortion laws in recent years, rather than loosening them. Three countries have done so since 1994: Poland, El Salvador and Nicaragua. During that time, 59 countries expanded access, according to the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Under Roe, the United States has been unusual in allowing abortion for any reason until around 23 weeks. Yet in many countries where the thresholds are earlier, abortion is permitted for a wide variety of reasons, according to the center.

Sixty-six countries – home to around a quarter of women of childbearing age – either ban abortion or allow it only if a woman’s life is in danger. Without Roe, some states will align with these countries.

Our January article explains international approaches to abortion law.

Quickly, then slowly.

Several states have already stopped offering abortions in anticipation of this decision.

Due to the wording of the trigger laws, clinics in more states will most likely begin closing immediately. In other states, the laws will activate in about a month.

There are also many states where abortion law may be caught up in the courts, or where legislatures will make legal changes in the days, weeks and months to come. Abortion will become a topic of active political debate in many parts of the country for years to come.

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Great Lakes water levels could rise an average of 7.5 to 17 inches over the next few decades, study finds https://asso-sable.net/great-lakes-water-levels-could-rise-an-average-of-7-5-to-17-inches-over-the-next-few-decades-study-finds/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:07:30 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/great-lakes-water-levels-could-rise-an-average-of-7-5-to-17-inches-over-the-next-few-decades-study-finds/ “We were able to develop a coupled modeling system that not only considered the interactions between the lakes, atmosphere, and surrounding land, but also presented a more realistic and accurate representation of Great Lakes hydrodynamic processes in climate modelling.” , Xue said. “This is a necessary step to ultimately improve long-term lake level projections.” Great […]]]>

“We were able to develop a coupled modeling system that not only considered the interactions between the lakes, atmosphere, and surrounding land, but also presented a more realistic and accurate representation of Great Lakes hydrodynamic processes in climate modelling.” , Xue said. “This is a necessary step to ultimately improve long-term lake level projections.”

Great Lakes residents are already struggling with erosion and flooding — common effects of high water levels — especially after record high water levels in 2019 and 2020. And even though water levels n are no longer reaching record levels, erosion and flooding remain huge problems.

“Climate change in Great Lakes water levels is a prospect we take seriously, said Jeff Johnson, public information officer at the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. , in an email. “This is one of the reasons to work toward a carbon neutral Michigan by 2050 through the MI Healthy Climate Plan…I am confident that we will be proactive and responsive to challenges if these projected high water levels occur. realize.”

Johnston also referenced steps taken by EGLE to expedite applications for shoreline protection permits in 2020 when landowners were struggling with flooding.

And even before that, around the lakes, cities like Duluth were struggling with the combination of extreme weather and high water levels.

“The storms that caused massive infrastructure damage in Duluth in 2017-18 were not, by historical standards, particularly huge storms; what made them so damaging was that they happened when the lake level was high,” said Jay Austin, a professor at the University of Minnesota at Duluth. “We can expect to see more of this kind of infrastructure impact in the future.”

Austin’s work also examines the impact of climate change on the Great Lakes, although his research focuses on ice and water temperature.

When it comes to the heavy impacts of climate change, modeling can give people a chance to prepare.

“We can’t experiment to see how the lake is going to react to higher air temperatures or lower or higher precipitation or anything like that,” Austin said. “We don’t have that kind of control over nature. And so what we can do is take predictions of how the climate will change over time and then use models like Dr. Xue did and say here’s what the lake levels are going to do.

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National Guard expansion on Camp Grayling: Troops won’t be in your backyard https://asso-sable.net/national-guard-expansion-on-camp-grayling-troops-wont-be-in-your-backyard/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/national-guard-expansion-on-camp-grayling-troops-wont-be-in-your-backyard/ GRAYLING—In front of a packed crowd at the local community college Wednesday night, state land managers and military officials sought to allay public concerns about a plan to dramatically expand National Guard access to the Michigan Army to Northern Michigan Public Forests. “I know we’re not going to convince everyone,” said Col. Scott Meyers, commanding […]]]>

GRAYLING—In front of a packed crowd at the local community college Wednesday night, state land managers and military officials sought to allay public concerns about a plan to dramatically expand National Guard access to the Michigan Army to Northern Michigan Public Forests.

“I know we’re not going to convince everyone,” said Col. Scott Meyers, commanding officer of the Camp Grayling Joint Maneuver Training Center. “I understand.”

But Meyers cited a proposed 1,500-foot buffer zone around rivers and lakes as the kind of concessions the military is willing to make to reassure area residents and outdoor enthusiasts who fear noise, environmental damage and other consequences may follow any increased military presence in the woods. surrounding Camp Grayling.

Related:

Dismay has been simmering since early May, when Michigan Department of Natural Resources officials began notifying residents that the National Guard wanted to lease 162,000 acres of state-owned land in several counties, which more than doubled its current training grounds. The Guard says it needs the land to make Camp Grayling a year-round destination for cyber, electronic and space warfare training.

A Wednesday public meeting on the plan remained mostly civilian, with more than 200 attendees seated quietly as a moderator read written questions from the public and a panel of speakers from the DNR and National Guard responded.

Among the dozens of questions posed to the panel:

Why does the proposal not include a buffer zone around the houses?

“I have no problem adding that kind of buffer, Meyers said, as long as troops can still access nearby roads.

How much will Camp Grayling pay per acre to rent this property?

“We won’t pay for this,” Meyers said. The National Guard will lease the land for free, he said, contributing money to help cover expenses such as tree trimming and species management.

What prevents the base from using the land for other purposes in the future?

“Anything they want to do on the land they lease from us has to be vetted through our process,” said Tom Barnes, director of MNR’s Grayling Forest Management Unit.

Will cyber warfare training affect nearby cell phones or satellite dishes?

Military equipment operates on “different bands”, Meyers said, and will not interfere with signals used by civilians.

Others wondered how the expanded military presence would affect their property values ​​and the economy of towns near the proposed expanded training area. The expanded area crosses several small townships and would bring the Guard’s footprint closer to the communities of Houghton Lake and Higgins Lake. Still others wondered what kinds of environmental impacts might come from the military presence.

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Scientists travel to one of the foggiest places on Earth to study a mysterious phenomenon https://asso-sable.net/scientists-travel-to-one-of-the-foggiest-places-on-earth-to-study-a-mysterious-phenomenon/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/scientists-travel-to-one-of-the-foggiest-places-on-earth-to-study-a-mysterious-phenomenon/ A major scientific field study of sea fog off the east coast of Canada is about to begin. The research is funded by the US Department of Defense and hopes to better predict one of the most unpredictable weather phenomena: fog. Fog can quickly ruin visibility anywhere, from ports to highways to airports, and can […]]]>

A major scientific field study of sea fog off the east coast of Canada is about to begin.

The research is funded by the US Department of Defense and hopes to better predict one of the most unpredictable weather phenomena: fog.

Fog can quickly ruin visibility anywhere, from ports to highways to airports, and can interfere with weapons systems. But how it is created is not deeply understood, which is one reason why fog can only be predicted hours in advance, if at all.

“Prediction is critical because each year in Canada, about 50 to 60 people die due to visibility fog-related problems,” said Ismail Gultepe, a research scientist with the Department of Environment and Climate Change Canada who is participating in the project.

Ismail Gultepe is a research scientist with the Department of Environment and Climate Change Canada. (David Laughlin/CBC)

The researchers chose to study the Grand Banks region in the North Atlantic because it is one of the foggiest places in summer, along with the Yellow Sea off China. In 2023, the research study will shift to the Yellow Sea.

“I would say this is the largest fogging project ever undertaken to date,” said Joe Fernando of Notre Dame University in Indiana, who is leading the study.

He spoke from inside a hangar at Halifax Stanfield Airport, where more than four tons of atmospheric measurement equipment was being flown to Sable Island, 300 kilometers southeast of ‘Halifax.

Instruments will also be deployed from the Irving-owned offshore supply vessel Atlantic Condor, which was chartered for a month-long mission in July. The ship will sail from Sable Island to the Grand Banks.

“The overall goal of the project is to improve the predictability of sea fog as much as possible. It is very difficult to predict, one of the least predictable in marine meteorology, Fernando said.

Joe Fernando of Notre Dame University is leading the study. (David Laughlin/CBC)

The mystery of the fog

Fog is created when water droplets form around particles, but the interaction of all atmospheric processes involved is not well understood.

“The fog changes quickly and that’s the difficulty. It comes quickly, goes quickly, and we don’t know how long it’s going to stay,” Fernando said.

The United States Office of Naval Research commissioned the $7.5 million study. The data collected is not classified.

Fernando said an important part of the study includes “propagation of the directed energy laser beam through the atmosphere so that incoming targets can be canceled out by the laser beam.”

Canadian participation

Dozens of scientists are involved, including Canadian researchers from Environment and Climate Change Canada, York University, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network and the Dalhousie University in Halifax.

The Atlantic Condor will carry instruments from Rachel Chang’s laboratory.

The Dalhousie aerosol scientist will measure the size and number of particles in the atmosphere and their impact on fog visibility and duration.

Rachel Chang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Sciences at Dalhousie University. (David Laughlin/CBC)

She is also studying the droplets that form around a salt particle and those that form around industrial emissions blown into the area.

“That’s actually the core of what I’m really interested in is whether the source of the particles – whether they’re from the ocean or emissions – and whether that really affects visibility or not.”

Climate change

Ismail Gultepe of the Department of Environment and Climate Change Canada is also studying the impact of climate change on the creation and disappearance of fog. The more water vapor created in the open ocean, the more fog there is, he said.

“That’s why we like to know how fog survives and how weather conditions change,” Gultepte said, adding that an important outcome will be improved modeling to predict fog.

A hangar at Halifax Airport is shown. Atmospheric equipment is being prepared for flight to Sable Island where it will be installed as part of the field study. (David Laughlin/CBC)

The project is known as FATIMA, for Fog and Turbulence Interactions in the Marine Atmosphere.

The study will measure wind turbulence, fog microphysics and chemistry, cloud height, water vapor and other conditions. It will use weather balloons, radar and lidar.

The Atlantic Condor will also deploy a small, remote-controlled vessel and glider that will perform measurements in the high seas and lower atmosphere.

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