Dairy goat farming – Asso Sable http://asso-sable.net/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 08:56:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://asso-sable.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/asso-120x120.png Dairy goat farming – Asso Sable http://asso-sable.net/ 32 32 Foot-and-mouth disease could be an ‘apocalypse’ for New Zealand, agriculture sector on red alert https://asso-sable.net/foot-and-mouth-disease-could-be-an-apocalypse-for-new-zealand-agriculture-sector-on-red-alert/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 00:00:40 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/foot-and-mouth-disease-could-be-an-apocalypse-for-new-zealand-agriculture-sector-on-red-alert/ How does it spread? Foot-and-mouth disease is extremely contagious. It was spread within herds by other animals in contact with the saliva or secretions from the blisters of infected animals. It can also be spread through breathing, mucous membranes and feces. Even rodents living on a farm with animals infected with foot-and-mouth disease can spread […]]]>

How does it spread?

Foot-and-mouth disease is extremely contagious. It was spread within herds by other animals in contact with the saliva or secretions from the blisters of infected animals. It can also be spread through breathing, mucous membranes and feces. Even rodents living on a farm with animals infected with foot-and-mouth disease can spread the virus from place to place.

Humans can do it too: foot-and-mouth disease lives long on surfaces and the virus can attach itself to clothing.

When foot-and-mouth disease is discovered in a country, its eradication is extremely difficult and costly. Often large-scale culling is the most viable option.

An outbreak in the UK in 2001 cost the country billions of pounds and led to the slaughter of millions of cattle.

Why is it in the news?

Earlier this year, Indonesia announced cases of foot-and-mouth disease in that country. While foot and mouth disease is prevalent in some parts of the world, Indonesia has been free of foot and mouth disease for almost 40 years. New Zealand has never had an epidemic.

Since Indonesia is important in international trade and tourism, it is possible that the disease will spread to other FMD-free countries.

In July, it was reported that traces of foot-and-mouth disease fragments had been found on pork products imported into Australia, but so far that country has avoided a large-scale outbreak.

How did New Zealand react?

As an isolated island nation, New Zealand has several natural advantages.

We also have recent experience with mycoplasma bovis, which means biosecurity systems are strengthened and farmers are aware of the importance of record keeping.

In July, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced a new awareness campaign highlighting the importance of vigilance for New Zealanders traveling to Indonesia; provide special disinfectant floor mats for arrivals from Indonesia; tailor-made baggage query and search processes for people from FMD-affected countries; and the establishment of a foot and mouth disease preparedness working group.

This is in addition to funding increases for biosafety that have taken place over the past few years.

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Eco-extremists who want to destroy UK agriculture can get away with it, says Mark Dolan https://asso-sable.net/eco-extremists-who-want-to-destroy-uk-agriculture-can-get-away-with-it-says-mark-dolan/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 20:20:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/eco-extremists-who-want-to-destroy-uk-agriculture-can-get-away-with-it-says-mark-dolan/ Eco-extremists are set to step up their campaign against the traditional British diet by proposing a meat tax, which would make us pay more for pork, lamb and chicken, and could potentially see a levy on dairy products and other animal products. food. It’s a bunch of nonsense. Why let the facts get in the […]]]>

Eco-extremists are set to step up their campaign against the traditional British diet by proposing a meat tax, which would make us pay more for pork, lamb and chicken, and could potentially see a levy on dairy products and other animal products. food.

It’s a bunch of nonsense.

Why let the facts get in the way of the truth that as omnivores we have survived and thrived on a mixed diet of vegetables and animal protein. And as we have evolved over millions of years, we now find ourselves in control of nature, and at the top of the food chain. The most important species in the history of the planet, a kilometer away. So I would say that we do well on a meat-based diet. But why let facts get in the way of a good story when eco-warriors, non-governmental organizations and even companies like supermarkets are advocating a plant-based diet, which involves packaged and processed foods, filled with water, vegetable oils, sugar, and Frankenstein ingredients like soy and pea protein.

Plant-based products are a gold rush for the so-called big food, processed food industry, which has been making us fatter and sicker for years. Plant-based food production involves a lot more water for things like almond milk than cow’s milk and relies on extensive monoculture agriculture, spraying crops with an aerial suspension of fertilizers and pesticides. Let me tell you, vast fields of wheat, corn and soybeans are a disaster for biodiversity and the soil, the same soil, which is enriched, by RUMINANT animals, like cows and sheep. Plus, there’s all the packaging involved with plant-based foods and airline miles. But that’s the least of it. A plant-based diet doesn’t seem to be healthy either.

Last year, a University College London study found that vegan children grow up smaller, with weaker bones than those who eat meat.

He revealed that children aged five to ten who followed a plant-based diet were on average three centimeters shorter. They also had 4-6% lower bone mineral content and were more than three times more likely to be vitamin B-12 deficient than omnivores.

While the doctors in that study recommended a litany of supplements to support a plant-based diet, the University of Vienna this week urged vegans to do weightlifting.

Vegan weightlifting? Blimey are you sure they have the energy for this? They can barely lift a lawyer. Austrian researchers told the Mail newspaper: “Our study showed that resistance training offsets reduced bone structure in vegans compared to omnivores.” It’s getting worse and worse – you might want to drop that corn on the cob.

University of Leeds health officials warn that women are a third more likely to break their hip if they follow a vegetarian diet.

Researchers followed 26,000 women for 20 years and said some vegetarians may lack enough nutrients for good bone and muscle health, which INCREASES the risk of breakouts.

Why do you think that would be?

Because meat, fish, eggs and cheese are full of so-called protein. I don’t know if you’ve heard of it? And animal products are much higher in so-called bioavailable protein than their plant-based competitors. This means it is more easily absorbed by the body and used for muscle growth.

Now I am a libertarian. So what happens on your plate is entirely up to you, but this meat-crawling mission must be called in and must be stopped. Not only is eating meat a human right – we MUST be able to eat whatever we want – these reports demonstrate that it is necessary for human health. Believe me, with all the extra carbs and unhealthy industrial vegetable fats like sunflower and canola oil, plant-based Britain will be fatter and sicker than ever.

So a plant-based diet requires extra vitamin pills just to make it healthy, it requires the consumption of mass-produced junk food, which isn’t cheap either, and it leaves women with weak hips and gives birth to smaller children. Not a ringing endorsement, is it? Of course, if it’s your lifestyle choice not to eat meat or even a religious or cultural reason, that’s fine. I have close friends who are vegan and they love it.

But it’s the culture of coercion, which we’ve seen during the pandemic, in which the choices people make for themselves are imposed on the rest of us. Muzzle our faces with these worthless environmentally catastrophic masks. Locking us in our homes, preventing us from going out to work in the unproven hope that lockdowns would stop Covid. Which of course they didn’t. Pressuring people to take a vaccine, which does not stop the spread of the virus and comes with its own risks.

But here we are, in the age of coercion, in which unelected technocrats and an encroaching, debauched state now seek to dictate every aspect of our lives, including what we eat. Eventually, there will likely be a modern form of rationing, in which your ribeye steak will be weighed by a butcher, according to government quotas. The state will decide what type of boiler you use, how many lights are on in your home, and what time of day it’s okay to have dinner or a cup of tea. It’s not a conspiracy guys. This is the reality, as the Telegraph reported last month.

Just a suggestion at this point. But as we learned recently, what starts out as a suggestion becomes an instruction. If you can’t even decide when you’re having a fucking cup of tea, it’s not Britain anymore. Just a member of a hellish world confederation with our prime minister as a mere figurehead.

GB News is the people’s channel and the only answer to all of this is people power. Peacefully and democratically of course. This gradual restriction of our freedoms, including what goes on our plate, is a model they’ve tried during the pandemic and had unexpected success with. So they will continue to do so. The idea of ​​bodily autonomy – whether it’s what’s going on in your arm or what’s going on in your gob – will soon be a thing of the past, if it isn’t already.

So I say no to meat taxes – well-raised meat, fish and eggs should actually be subsidized and made cheaper, to solve our health crisis. So I say no to plant-based processed junk food. And not to our great British farmers, bankrupted by these policies, or seeing their land reallocated and sold, producing cows, sheep and goats, a sight as rare in the British countryside as Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster. . As long as we are on this planet, we decide what we eat. I can’t believe I have to say this. But here we are.

To those who seek to destroy British agriculture and make us weaker, sadder, fatter and sicker, with a diet unfit for human health, I say don’t touch my sausage. We’re not all sheep, you know. You can pork right away.

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Forest fires burn, farmers struggle as another heatwave bakes Western Europe https://asso-sable.net/forest-fires-burn-farmers-struggle-as-another-heatwave-bakes-western-europe/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 15:09:07 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/forest-fires-burn-farmers-struggle-as-another-heatwave-bakes-western-europe/ By Manuel Ausloos and Stéphane Mahé HOSTENS, France, Aug 11 (Reuters) – European nations sent fire crews to help France tackle a “monster” wildfire on Thursday, while wildfires also raged in Spain and Portugal and the head of the European Space Agency has called for immediate action to combat climate change. More than 1,000 firefighters, […]]]>

By Manuel Ausloos and Stéphane Mahé

HOSTENS, France, Aug 11 (Reuters) – European nations sent fire crews to help France tackle a “monster” wildfire on Thursday, while wildfires also raged in Spain and Portugal and the head of the European Space Agency has called for immediate action to combat climate change.

More than 1,000 firefighters, supported by water bomber planes, battled for a third day a blaze that forced thousands from their homes and burned thousands of hectares of forest in southwestern Gironde.

With a dangerous cocktail of scorching temperatures, powder keg conditions and wind fanning the flames, emergency services struggled to bring the blaze under control.

“He’s an ogre, a monster,” said Grégory Allione of the FNSPF.

Heat waves, flooding and collapsing glaciers in recent weeks have heightened concerns about climate change and the increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events across the world.

European Space Agency chief Josef Aschbacher said rising land temperatures and shrinking rivers measured from space left no doubt about the consequences of climate change on agriculture and other industries.

ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-3 series of satellites have measured “extreme” earth surface temperatures of over 45°C (113°F) in Britain, 50°C in France and 60°C in Spain in recent weeks.

“It’s pretty bad. We’ve seen extremes that have never been seen before,” Aschbacher told Reuters.

In Romania, where record high temperatures and drought have drained rivers of water, Greenpeace activists demonstrated on the parched banks of the Danube to draw attention to global warming and urge the government to cut emissions.

CLIMATE CHANGE RISKS

With successive heat waves hitting Europe this summer, searing temperatures and unprecedented droughts, renewed attention has been given to the risks of climate change to agriculture, industry and livelihoods.

A severe drought is expected to reduce the European Union’s maize harvest by 15% to its lowest level in 15 years, just as Europeans face higher food prices due to below-average grain exports. normal from Russia and Ukraine.

Swiss army helicopters have been mobilized to ferry water to parched cows, pigs and goats sweltering in the scorching sun in the country’s alpine meadows.

In France, which is suffering from its harshest drought on record, trucks are delivering water to dozens of villages where taps have gone dry, nuclear power plants have been granted exemptions to continue pumping hot water discharged into the river, and farmers warn that a shortage of fodder could lead to milk shortages.

In Germany, low rainfall this summer has drained water levels from the Rhine, the country’s commercial artery, hampering shipping and increasing freight costs.

However, as Europe faces another heatwave, one group of workers have no choice but to sweat: the gig economy food delivery guys who often fall through the cracks of labor regulations.

After the mayor of Palermo, on the island of Sicily, in July ordered horses transporting tourists to receive at least 10 liters of water a day, bicycle courier Gaetano Russo filed a complaint demanding similar treatment.

“Am I worth less than a horse,” Russo said in a statement from the Nidil CDIL union.

“SORRY”

The UK Met Office issued a four-day “extreme heat” warning for parts of England and Wales on Thursday.

In Portugal, more than 1,500 firefighters spent a sixth day fighting a wildfire in the central region of Covilha that burned 10,500 hectares (40 square miles), including parts of Serra da Estrela National Park.

In Spain, electrical storms sparked new forest fires and hundreds of people were evacuated from the path of a fire in the province of Caceres.

Macron’s office said additional firefighting planes were arriving from Greece and Sweden, while Germany, Austria, Romania and Poland were all deploying firefighters to help fight wildfires. in France.

“European solidarity at work!” Macron tweeted.

Firefighters said they managed to save the village of Belin-Beliet, which emptied out after police told residents to evacuate as the flames approached. But the blaze reached the outskirts, leaving behind charred houses and crumbling tractors.

“We were lucky. Our houses were saved. But you see the disaster there. Some houses could not be saved,” said resident Gaetan, pointing to burnt houses.

The Gironde was affected by major forest fires in July.

“The neighborhood is totally disfigured. We are heartbroken, we are exhausted,” Jean-Louis Dartiailh, a local mayor, told Radio Classique. “(This fire) is the straw that broke the camel’s back.” (Reporting by Reuters offices; Writing by Richard Lough; Editing by Alex Richardson)

© Copyright Thomson Reuters 2022. Click for restrictions.

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Farmers’ groups receive subsidies for raising goats « Khabarhub https://asso-sable.net/farmers-groups-receive-subsidies-for-raising-goats-khabarhub/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 07:16:46 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/farmers-groups-receive-subsidies-for-raising-goats-khabarhub/ Farmer groups receive subsidies for raising goats Goat/Image for representation POKHARA: Commercial goat herders have received subsidies worth Rs 2 million in rural areas of the metropolitan city of Pokhara. The program is part of encouraging farmers to promote goat farming, it is said. The Mayor of Metropolitan City of Pokhara, Dhanraj Acharya has provided […]]]>

Farmer groups receive subsidies for raising goats

Goat/Image for representation

POKHARA: Commercial goat herders have received subsidies worth Rs 2 million in rural areas of the metropolitan city of Pokhara.

The program is part of encouraging farmers to promote goat farming, it is said. The Mayor of Metropolitan City of Pokhara, Dhanraj Acharya has provided Rs 500,000 each to four different groups as part of a goat herding package.

The metropolitan city provides financial assistance to farmers every year.

According to Head of Livestock Services Section, Nabaraj Adhikari, the recipients are Milijuli Goat Herders Group of Pokhara-13, Sarangkot Goat Herders Group of Pokhara-18, Laganshil goat herders from Pokhara-32 and Begnas goat herders. ‘ Pokhara-31 group.

Adhikari added that more than 100 goat herders have benefited from the grants.

Likewise, Farmer Durga Bahadur Gurung from Mauja Hill Pokhara Cattle Farm was awarded the “Outstanding Farmer of the Year” award for his contribution to the development of a pocket area for the goat farming and for encouraging other farmers to do the same.

Mayor Acharya said the metropolitan city would become self-sufficient in vegetables, milk, eggs, meat and fruits within the next five years, adding that farmers would instead be made more commercial.

He said preparations are underway to operate an agricultural ambulance and run cold stores to ensure the market for agricultural products in the metropolitan city.

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These are free farming apps to download from App & Play Stores https://asso-sable.net/these-are-free-farming-apps-to-download-from-app-play-stores/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:59:49 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/these-are-free-farming-apps-to-download-from-app-play-stores/ It’s Farming apps Award-winning all-in-one all-digital agricultural information portal, It’s farming, released its new free-to-download mobile apps to enhance user experience. Readers can access the latest agricultural and rural news and developments through the company’s apps, which are available on the Play Store (Android devices) and App Store (Apple devices, including iPad and iPhone). The […]]]>

It’s Farming apps

Award-winning all-in-one all-digital agricultural information portal, It’s farming, released its new free-to-download mobile apps to enhance user experience.

Readers can access the latest agricultural and rural news and developments through the company’s apps, which are available on the Play Store (Android devices) and App Store (Apple devices, including iPad and iPhone).

The new, easy-to-use apps build on the company’s previous releases and offer additional features, including:

  • New presentation;
  • New search function;
  • An eight-dot menu bar to aid in website navigation.

Content includes:

  • New;
  • Beef;
  • Dairy;
  • Machinery;
  • the steps ;
  • Sheep;
  • Videos;
  • Funny.

It’s farming

It’s farming readers can access cutting-edge news, tech tips and expert advice and features from grassroots members of the industry, including but not limited to farmers (dairy, cattle, sheep, equine , alpacas, goats, pigs, poultry and tillage), agricultural contractors, advisers and veterinary personnel.

The digital news publisher is dedicated to providing technical, original and high-quality content to its ever-expanding audience locally, nationally and internationally (US, UK and New Zealand).

All content is freely accessible (no paywall or subscription fees) 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, directly through its website – www.thatsfarming.com, apps and social media channels.

Story

The company, headquartered in the west of Ireland, was founded by the late Eugene Dalton and is run by Catherina Cunnane, a sixth-generation farmer from Co. Mayo, supported by a talented team of creators of content.

Cunnane, who has a strong background in agriculture and media, joined the company during its start-up phase in 2015 as a freelance writer.

The sixth-generation Mayo farmer now serves as managing director and editor at It’s farminga sister company of Corrib Oil.

More information

You can read content through its website – www.thatsfarming.com or download apps through Play Store and App Store.

To share your story with It’s farming, email Catherina – catherina@thatsfarming.com

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How does livestock affect climate change? https://asso-sable.net/how-does-livestock-affect-climate-change/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 18:15:40 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/how-does-livestock-affect-climate-change/ The link between livestock and climate change has never been clearer. Raising animals for food uses extraordinary amounts of water, causes deforestation and is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, making the practice of raising animals seriously detrimental to the climate and to the overall health of the planet. Research suggests that a number […]]]>

The link between livestock and climate change has never been clearer. Raising animals for food uses extraordinary amounts of water, causes deforestation and is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, making the practice of raising animals seriously detrimental to the climate and to the overall health of the planet. Research suggests that a number of changes, including dietary changes, can help reduce food-related climate emissions.

How does livestock farming affect climate change?

Raising animals on farms for food production has a huge impact on the health of the environment. Animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, including nitrous oxide and methane, to water pollution and to the destruction of forests and other wild areas that help regulate the atmosphere of the planet.

How does livestock contribute to greenhouse gas emissions?

The two main greenhouse gases produced by the practice of farming animals are methane and nitrous oxide. Globally, raising animals for food contributes at least 16.5% of greenhouse gas pollution.

Nitrous oxide

Nitrous oxide is almost 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide when measured on a 100-year global warming potential scale. A number of agricultural practices contribute to nitrous oxide pollution, including soil management practices such as applying synthetic and organic fertilizers to grow food for people and animals, handling manure from raising animals for food and burning crop residues. According to EPA figures, these practices account for 74% of all nitrous oxide emissions in the United States.

Methane

Accounting for about 11% of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, methane has an impact 25 times greater than carbon dioxide. The agricultural sector is the largest source of methane emissions in the United States, according to EPA estimates.

Livestock Methane Emissions

Ruminants commonly raised for food, including cattle, goats and sheep, emit methane when they digest their food through a process known as enteric fermentation. During this process, microbes in the digestive tract of animals break down and ferment plant parts such as cellulose, starches, sugars and fibers. This process is incredibly efficient – ruminants like cows can eat plants and crop waste that humans cannot thanks to their larger stomach chamber called the ‘rumen’ – but a by-product of this process is the toxic pollutant methane, released into the atmosphere mainly by animal burps.

Methane from livestock manure is another source of emissions, particularly important for concentrated animal feed, or CAFO, hog and dairy cattle operations that store manure in liquid form.

How does deforestation affect climate change?

Forests and other wild areas like savannahs play an important role in storing carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. Unfortunately, forests and other natural ecosystems around the world are being destroyed to make way for urban expansion, logging, mining and agriculture.

The largest forest in the world is the Amazon rainforest, which covers 2.72 million square kilometers and spans nine different countries. Considered one of Earth’s largest terrestrial carbon stores, the Amazon stores approximately 123 billion tons of carbon.

In addition to the role these ecosystems play in storing carbon, forests also stabilize soils with their roots, preventing erosion. When forests are destroyed, the soil itself is also able to hold less water, increasing the likelihood of flooding of nearby communities. Deforestation in some areas can also lead to an increased likelihood of drought as the water cycle is disrupted.

The main driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest is animal agriculture, which has been linked to 75% of cover loss. Loggers and farmers in the Amazon cut down trees to create ranches where cattle and other farm animals can live and graze, as well as to create fields of corn and soybeans to feed farm animals .

When forests are destroyed, whether by fire or converted to grow animal feed, carbon dioxide, once stored, is released into the atmosphere. Worse, these actions also rob the land of its ability to store carbon, described by researchers as a lost “opportunity cost” to climate action that can only be recovered if the land is reforested or reseeded.

How does meat consumption affect climate change?

Greenhouse gas

Feed-related greenhouse gas emissions come from a variety of sources along the livestock supply chain. Sources include the burps and manure of the animals themselves, the storage of their manure, the use of fertilizers on the fields used to raise them, fuel for transportation, the land used to feed and raise them and heating and machinery necessary for animal agricultural production. .

Water use and pollution

Feeding and raising animals because livestock uses much more water than growing crops like soybeans or lentils. Beef production requires 15,415 liters per kilogram of meat, 112 liters per gram of protein and 153 liters per gram of fat. A third of all water used by the livestock sector is for beef production. Another 19 percent goes to dairy cattle for the production of milk and other dairy products.

Cattle ranching also pollutes waterways, disproportionately affecting black and indigenous communities, as well as other communities of color. This pollution comes mainly from manure pits or lagoons created to retain the droppings of the thousands of animals housed in factory farms. When pits leak or overflow, the nitrogen and other contaminants in the manure pollute local water sources, causing or exacerbating many health problems in surrounding communities. To avoid spillage, farmers often spread too much manure on fields, which also leads to polluting runoff.

How does climate change affect livestock?

The production of meat and other animal products is a major contributor to climate change, which in turn worsens the lives of millions of animals living in factory farms.

Thermal stress

A central feature of industrialized agriculture is its efficiency, achieved by herding thousands of animals into a relatively small area to feed them for slaughter. The cramped quarters in which these animals live, coupled with rising temperatures, lead to metabolic disruptions, damage to body cells and immune suppression, which in turn make disease, infection and death more likely.

Why do some people say that beef production is only a small contributor to emissions?

Some proponents defend beef by pointing to the growing ability of the cattle industry to produce more meat from each cow slaughtered. Since the 1970s, the number of cattle needed to meet beef demand in the United States has declined by about 50 million.

The industry made this shift through intensive breeding that resulted in cows that grew faster and bigger than their parents and grandparents. The 90 million cattle that are raised to meet the demand for beef today, for example, provide more meat per animal than 140 million cattle in the 1970s.

Less livestock means less greenhouse gas emissions, but industry efficiency alone is not enough to meet the climate targets set in the Paris Climate Agreement to limit global warming. Climate research indicates the deployment of a number of simultaneous strategies to reduce food-related emissions, including dietary change in countries that currently consume the most beef. In the United States, for example, Americans eat four times more than the world average.

Another common argument made by camp members minimizing beef emissions is that cattle raised for beef directly contribute only 3% of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. This percentage excludes climate impacts from land use, such as deforestation for grazing and growing animal feed.

Will eating less meat help reduce climate change?

Eating less meat is one of the most effective ways to reduce our personal or family contribution to climate change. Indeed, foods of plant origin have on average a carbon footprint 10 to 50 times lower than that of products of animal origin. Choosing to eat vegetarian also cuts water intake by one-third to one-half compared to a diet that contains meat. Wasting less food is another powerful form of household climate action.

Future action: Food system transition

Industrial animal farming is detrimental to ecosystems and communities, as well as to the health of the planet on which we all depend.

Food system change is a powerful and empowering form of climate action. To begin to shift food systems away from their current focus on animal protein, several advocacy groups are working with farmers to transition out of the livestock industry. One example is Transfarmation, an organization that works with poultry and pork producers to grow crops like mushrooms and hemp rather than raising animals for food. These efforts are only a small part of the much-needed collective transition to a more plant-rich food system.

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Regenerative Agriculture Event Bundle | Harvests https://asso-sable.net/regenerative-agriculture-event-bundle-harvests/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/regenerative-agriculture-event-bundle-harvests/ The Land Stewardship Project is hosting two field days in August in Minnesota. Field days will focus on soil health, grazing and more. The first field day will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on August 17 at the farm of Luke and Holly Bergler at 37062 County Road 12, Dakota, Minnesota. Topics […]]]>

The Land Stewardship Project is hosting two field days in August in Minnesota. Field days will focus on soil health, grazing and more.

The first field day will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on August 17 at the farm of Luke and Holly Bergler at 37062 County Road 12, Dakota, Minnesota. Topics will cover 60-inch no-till corn intercropped with a diverse cover crop mix, diversifying crop rotations, converting marginal soils to pasture, reducing applied nitrogen rates, and managing profitability. .

Allen Williams, a seasoned producer and consultant in regenerative agriculture, will lead the tour. He is a sixth generation family farmer and founding partner of Grass Fed Insights, Understanding Ag and the Soil Health Academy. Williams has a doctorate in livestock genetics and has pioneered many regenerative grazing protocols and forage finishing techniques.

People also read…

Luke and Holly Bergler, along with their three children, herd cows and calves on rotational pasture. They also grow row crops and forages using no-till, cover crops and crop rotations with reduced synthetic inputs.

Field day two will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on August 18 at Jordan’s Farm and Rachelle Meyer’s Farm at 15091 Crazy Corners Road, Caledonia, Minnesota. Williams will also lead the tour at Meyer’s Farm.

The field day will include a mass grazing demonstration. Discussions will cover practical soil health and grazing tools, livestock handling techniques, grazing and profitability, direct marketing and juggling multiple businesses.

Jordan and Rachelle Meyer, along with their six children, operate Wholesome Family Farms. They raise 100% grass-fed beef and goats, pasture-raised pork and poultry, and ranch-raised cattle. They practice adaptive grazing on over 600 acres and raise row crops with cover crops on 400 acres. The Meyers are also part of a family dairy operation.

Single-day tickets are $30 per adult; both days are $50. Admission for children is free. Lunches, including farm-raised beef, will be served daily. Register before August 12. Visit landstewardshipproject.org/allenwilliams or contact aromano@landstewardshipproject.org for more information.

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County Board District 1: Erica Jepson would support MPs; using onboard agriculture and social services experience – Detroit Lakes Tribune https://asso-sable.net/county-board-district-1-erica-jepson-would-support-mps-using-onboard-agriculture-and-social-services-experience-detroit-lakes-tribune/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/county-board-district-1-erica-jepson-would-support-mps-using-onboard-agriculture-and-social-services-experience-detroit-lakes-tribune/ DETROIT LAKES – Erica Jepson wants to use her background in agriculture and her knowledge of social services to benefit the residents and employees of Becker County. “County employees asked me to run because they felt we really needed some positive change on the council due to the current employee crisis. The county administrator has […]]]>

DETROIT LAKES – Erica Jepson wants to use her background in agriculture and her knowledge of social services to benefit the residents and employees of Becker County.

“County employees asked me to run because they felt we really needed some positive change on the council due to the current employee crisis. The county administrator has been there for six months, and in the six months he has been there, over 50 people have quit,” she said.

The sheriff’s office, for example, has seen a 40% increase in calls for service since 1999, but has only been allowed to increase its patrol staff by 14%, she said. And those calls are bigger because of the drug problem in Becker County, she added.

“I worked closely with law enforcement – I was in child and family services – and the county’s high bond rating was set on the backs of our deputies” , she said.

Additionally, she said, “I’m known for my ability to stand up for what’s right — I’m not a ‘yes’ person, I vote in the best interests of the county, not because someone tells me how to vote.” I don’t bend under pressure – we need this kind of person on the board.

Jepson says she also understands how government works at multiple levels, what can be done at each level, and how to push for change. “I am curious and will ask as many questions as necessary to understand and learn about all areas of local government in Becker County.”

If elected as Becker County Commissioner for District 1, she added, “I will work to ensure citizens’ concerns are addressed, federal and state requirements are met, and county operations continue. run smoothly.”

Jepson, 41, says there are five good reasons to vote for her to represent District 1 on the Becker County Board:

“First, I am passionate about making positive changes in Becker County that reflect our rural values ​​and common sense. Second, I will make informed decisions with the best interests of the citizens of District 1 Becker County in mind. Third, I understand how to balance people’s needs while being fiscally responsible. Fourth, I understand the work of many county departments and will learn more about those I don’t know by talking to employees and the people they serve. Five, I will bring to the county council work experience and knowledge that is not held by any other member of the council, she said.

Jepson married her husband, Brett, in 2002 and has one daughter, Allison. They own and operate a farm in Evergreen Township that Brett purchased from his parents, Ernie and Shirley Jepson, in 1998.

They were dairy farmers, “until they made the difficult decision in 2019 to sell our dairy cows and move into goat and beef farming which we continue today,” she said. “Being farmers instilled many values ​​in our family including hard work, passion, patience, integrity, respect for mother nature and the importance of family, friends and neighbours.”

Jepson graduated from Bemidji State University in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in social work and attended the National Education for Women Leadership Institute and the White House Project (a nonprofit organization that has worked to increase women’s representation). women in US institutions, business and government) in 2010 before starting her career as a social worker at White Earth Indian Child Welfare in 2011.

“I continued my career with Becker County Human Services from 2013 to December 2021,” she added. “While at Becker County Human Services, I served as a labor management committee member for two years, as well as a shop steward for five years.”

She was endorsed by the Teamsters union, which represents nearly half of Becker County employees, and currently works for the Minnesota Department of Social Services as a child protection expert.

The county council has authority over a wide range of things – social services, corrections, child protection, library services, hospitals and nursing homes, public health services, planning and zoning, economic development, parks and recreation , water quality, roads and solid waste management, to name a few.

“Many of these services are largely governed by state law and require quick and decisive decision makers at the county level to ensure compliance, as well as the ability to recommend intelligent changes if necessary,” she said. , adding that it is important to have a county council with diverse knowledge and experience making these decisions for the county.

District 1 is represented by longtime commissioner Larry Knutson of Toad Lake, who is not running for election this year. The district encompasses roughly the eastern half of Becker County.

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What do grazing goats and growing mango trees have in common? https://asso-sable.net/what-do-grazing-goats-and-growing-mango-trees-have-in-common/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 14:45:49 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/what-do-grazing-goats-and-growing-mango-trees-have-in-common/ Grameenphone brings f-commerce to mango growers in Bangladesh. To which a possible reaction is good, it’s good, now what’s on TV? We can also use this as an example of why mobile telecommunications – which includes mobile internet and access to Facebook on it – makes the world so much richer. There’s actually an argument […]]]>

Grameenphone brings f-commerce to mango growers in Bangladesh.

To which a possible reaction is good, it’s good, now what’s on TV?

We can also use this as an example of why mobile telecommunications – which includes mobile internet and access to Facebook on it – makes the world so much richer.

There’s actually an argument out there that claims that this boom, which has driven the growth of poor countries over the past two decades, has really been all about this one technology.

This claim is indeed made even if it does not quite stand up to close scrutiny.

But the underlying point has great strength. It allows markets to complement each other.

Competing markets are just another piece of economist jargon, but it matters a lot.

The idea is that there are a lot of transactions that could happen, a lot of things that could be done, if only the various people involved actually knew each other.

The example often used in the literature is that of goat grazing in Kenya — no, there is no particular reason for this activity and location, it is just the example that has become commonplace.

Imagine a guy with a few empty fields. Also imagine a guy a few miles away with hungry goats.

If they can’t communicate, if there’s no information system between them, then they can’t put the goats in the field just because they don’t know each other.

Now add that ability to communicate.

Say, given our example above, mutual access to Facebook and vital local “goat feed” pages.

Both assets can now be put to better use, the goats are getting food, presumably milk and meat from the new surplus is paid to the owner of the field, and everyone is richer.

Yes, obviously increasing goat production is not what modern economies are made of.

Nor is it the creation of great wealth of any kind.

But an observation often made about poor economies is that there are not hundreds, not thousands, but hundreds of thousands of such small and marginal gains that could be made if only markets could complement each other.

If the holders of an asset could know those of others, so that a mutually beneficial market transaction could be carried out.

The effect of allowing these transactions to occur is, on the whole, and – when we add them all together – substantial.

Long before the mobile Internet existed, an estimate indicated that only cell phones increased GDP by half a percent.

More than that actually – for every 10% of the population that had mobile GDP increased by half a percent each year.

Maybe not that if everyone had one then the economy would grow 5% every year but also, well, why not?

Because, in many countries, the fixed network was between pitiful and almost non-existent.

So cellphones have enabled exactly those transactions that wealthy countries – with their fixed networks that reach everywhere – have been doing for half a century and more.

It is also possible to run this same observation in the other direction.

We believe that new technology is synonymous with economic growth; and to some extent, of course. The factories that make the phones, build the towers that run the transmissions, they are growth.

But the real benefit of any new technology comes from what people use it to do.

Maybe it will be entirely new things.

But the real boost comes when people are able to use new technology to do old things more efficiently.

We may be talking about f-commerce here, so Facebook, which relies on the internet part of mobiles, but the tech stack allows mango cultivation to become more efficient. We may have more mangoes, or fresher mangoes, or better distributed – but a more efficient mango industry is still lacking.

To a lesser extent, of course, mangoes do not constitute a significant part of the national economy.

But add up all the little ways and that’s how we all get richer.

Mango market efficiency is one of the things we didn’t focus on before because we just didn’t have information on who wanted to; but we do now.

This is also why the best reaction to the uses of new technology is simply to step back and observe.

We might indeed need state planning to enable things – we certainly do with mobiles, if only to know who can use which parts of the electromagnetic spectrum to provide them.

But the planning of who is going to do what with shiny new technology, no, best left to the markets.

Because no government planning system will be detailed enough to manage goat grazing now, will it?

And if that were the case, we certainly wouldn’t want to live under such a detailed government.

Tim Worstall is a senior research fellow at the Adam Smith Institute in London

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Highlights of soilless agriculture Kabale Farm Clinic https://asso-sable.net/highlights-of-soilless-agriculture-kabale-farm-clinic/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://asso-sable.net/highlights-of-soilless-agriculture-kabale-farm-clinic/ The Seeds of Gold Farm Clinic returns today with the first outreach to the Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute (KaZARDI) in the Kigezi Highlands. Thanks to aeroponic technology, Kachwekano ZARDI promotes the cultivation of potatoes without the need for soil or water. This modern potato cultivation technology is hailed as a technology of […]]]>

The Seeds of Gold Farm Clinic returns today with the first outreach to the Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute (KaZARDI) in the Kigezi Highlands.

Thanks to aeroponic technology, Kachwekano ZARDI promotes the cultivation of potatoes without the need for soil or water.

This modern potato cultivation technology is hailed as a technology of the future as land is becoming limited. The technology is desirable because it can fit anywhere without land.

According to Dr. Alex Barekye, Research Director at Kachwekano ZARDI, with its high scalability, good yields are expected.

“Over time, this will be a popular way to farm in the future,” says Dr Barekye. Nutrients and water are delivered to crops in the form of vapor gas.

The idea of ​​aeroponics dates back to the 1920s when the first trials were made with orchids but it is a developing innovation in Uganda.

Dr. Barekye notes that although this technology can be applied to a wide range of plants, including vegetables, potatoes grow well with this method. Combining tissue culture methods, planting is similar to hydroponics.

Compared to other farming methods, aeroponics takes up less growing space. With a farm water system, nutrients are carefully added to the water, supplied to the plants by a booster pump system. As it is a closed system, it is estimated to save over 90% of water and nutrients. Crop yield can be increased by 45-75% under ideal conditions.

In addition, humidity and temperature are always the most favorable for growth. Depending on the purpose of use, potatoes can be harvested by hand early.

Kachwekano ZARDI, which now focuses on multiplication of plant material, experimentation and trials on different crop varieties and animal breeds, provides extensive research on agroforestry, apples and pears, climbing beans, wheat and barley, sorghum, field peas and sericulture, among others.

Since the early 2000s, apple cultivation has provided opportunities for farmers in the Kabale region and experts will discuss best practices such as establishing orchards, land preparation, planting, induction of dormancy, defoliation, pruning as well as diseases such as powdery mildew, which threatens a number of farmers.

Currently, the Ugandan government is promoting apple production under the National Agricultural Advisory Services (Naads) program in the highlands of Kabale, Kisoro and Kanungu districts.

Farmers attend dairy training at an agricultural clinic in Kabanyolo. Photo/NMG

This aims to meet the growing demand for deciduous fruits. “Apple growing is a great opportunity for farmers to increase their income, but there is a major challenge of insufficient experience among farmers,” notes Dr Barekye.

In order to improve the livelihoods of farming communities in the region, experts will also share their knowledge on the varieties of goats improved at the station and how to get the most out of them.

With experienced goat herders, researchers and animal husbandry experts, the Kachwekano ZARDI Agricultural Clinic will provide a window of opportunity for farmers eager to learn more about the profitability of improved breeds.

Experts will also explore ways to restore degraded soils, a major challenge in the highlands, while looking at improved sorghum varieties. KaZARDI has evaluated 33 sorghum lines for upland tolerance and so far six promising lines have been selected for release. These varieties include; E 1291, Ndamoga, Shokani, MB 29, MB 30 and MB 27, and are being evaluated against the local check variety Kyatanombe.

Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute is located in Rubanda District, one of the six districts of Kigezi Region. It lies about 8 km from the Kabale-Kisoro road on the road to Lake Bunyonyi at an altitude of between 1800 and 2200 m above sea level.

The place receives an average rainfall of 875 mm per year with the first rains between March and May and the second rains from September to December with a minimum temperature of 8oC and a maximum temperature of 24oC.

Kachwekano was established by the British in 1937 for the experimentation and demonstration of crops, pastures and livestock of temperate origin. There was the introduction of merino sheep for wool production. Its fine and valuable wool was desirable but it would be discontinued as it would not make economic sense. Later in 1943, nicotine tobacco was introduced to generate money. So far, some farmers grow tobacco in the area, although tobacco marketing is not streamlined.

In 1949, Kachwekano became a district agricultural institute (IFD). One of the functions of the DFI was to provide practical courses in agriculture leading to the issuance of certificates to agricultural assistants and administrators such as parish and sub-county chiefs. This capacity building has equipped local leaders with skills to disseminate technologies that have increased agricultural productivity.

In 1952, the DFI began popularizing local goats and sheep as a source of income for smallholder farmers. However, this activity presented challenges of poor management and lack of pasture. The IFD prioritized other activities although the farmers continued to care for the native goats and sheep. In 1961, exotic cattle breeds were introduced and so far the region has one of the best exotic breeds in Uganda.

In 2000, the institute was placed under the National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO) as an Agricultural Research and Development Center (ARDC) to intensify agricultural research on commodities for agro areas -ecological highlands.

The main focus was on the multiplication of plant material, experimentation and trials on different crop varieties and animal breeds, animal traction for agricultural work such as plowing and transport, training of farmers and d other service providers. Commodities were mainly focused on agroforestry, apples and pears, potatoes, pole beans, wheat and barley, sorghum, field peas, poultry, dairy products, vegetables and sericulture, among others.

Through these efforts, stakeholders gained knowledge through technology transfer of modern farming methods, there was increased access to foundation seeds and storage materials.

Following the enactment and operationalization of the NARO Act of 2005, Kachwekano became a semi-autonomous public agricultural research institute under NARO.

KaZARDI was created in order to extend services closer to end users.

The institute is made up of satellite stations spread throughout the Kigezi region to extend services closer to the population. For example, in Kisoro there are Maziba, Nyamigogo and Nyabwishenya stations while in Kanungu district there is Kibimbiri station.

The role of the institute has also been changed to conduct applied and adaptive research and to facilitate the dissemination of technologies suitable for adoption pathways. The institute operates under three programs including: Crops and Natural Resources Research Program, Animal Resources Research Program, and Technology Promotion and Awareness Program. Kachwekano ZARDI implements most of its activities through local and international partnerships and collaborations. It has close links with international research centers, other NARO institutes, local governments, NGOs, CSOs and especially farmers’ groups in the area. This will be an opportunity to find out more about what KaZARDI is doing from the Seeds of Gold Farm clinic taking place at the institute today.

Today: Seeds of Gold Farm Clinic

Companies: Irish potato, apple, goat farming, soilless agriculture

Sponsors: Stanbic Bank, Bank of Uganda, NSSF, Naro, NMG

Admission: Free including meals

Main trainer: Dr. Alex Barekye

Kachwekano ZARDI, which now focuses on multiplication of plant material, experimentation and trials on different crop varieties and animal breeds, provides extensive research on agroforestry, apples and pears, climbing beans, wheat and barley, sorghum, field peas and sericulture, among others.

Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute is located in Rubanda District, one of the six districts of Kigezi Region. It lies about 8 km from the Kabale-Kisoro road along the Lake Bunyonyi road at an altitude of between 1800 and 2200 m above sea level. The place receives an average rainfall of 875 mm per year.

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